Translate this page

English Arabic French German Greek Swahili Turkish

20 August 2022 / 22. Muharram 1444

Pakistan Relief: 25 new homes bring joy to flood victims of 2010 – Kairpur Nathanshah, Pakistan

In August 2013, The World Federation completed the construction of 25 new homes in Khairpur Nathanshah, District Dadu, Sindh province in Pakistan. 25 families spanning 9 different villages in this city spent the last two years living in ragged tents, mud homes and broken huts. These families lost all of their homes and belongings in the 2010 floods which swept through Pakistan.

Today, some of these villages have no water facilities and the roadways into them are rugged and very difficult to drive on. The new homes that were constructed are made of concrete which will withstand Pakistan’s hot climate as well as its unpredictable monsoon season.

An inauguration ceremony was held to gift the new homes to their new owners. Community members gathered and prayed for the donors who made their dreams come true in the wake of their struggles. Each of the new homeowners was gifted with a house key, the Holy Qur’an, a prayer rug, a prayer book, a sajdagah and a tasbeeh.

     

Below are stories of 3 beneficiary families whose lives are changed forever after moving into their new home:

STORY 1:  A WIDOW AND MOTHER OF 7 CHILDREN
“Life for us was already hard because my husband was suffering from cancer. But when the 2010 floods came, our lives became much more difficult. Our home was washed away and we had to live in a house which had a big crack on the wall. We were afraid that the wall would collapse and the roof would fall on us at any time. In 2011, my husband died in this house. Soon after the house was demolished because it was not safe to live in there anymore, so we lived in a tent for two years. My 7 children and I then moved into my father’s home and all 8 of us slept in one small room. This room not in good condition and needed many repairs.

I have little children and the only source of income I have is what I earn as a farm labourer

There is no chance for my children to get education. In our village, about a year ago, an NGO offered to build houses. There was a condition that the owners had to pay for the foundation, but I had no money to do so and I missed that opportunity to better our lives. Allah (swt) knew how were passing our days in extreme winter and harsh summer; it cannot be expressed in words.

Thanks to my Almighty Allah (swt) and His people who felt sorry for me and my
Children, we now have a nice shelter furnished with a bathroom.”

STORY 2:  A DISABLED HUSBAND AND FATHER OF 2 DAUGHTERS
“I am sick and disabled. Because I am blind, I am unable to earn my livelihood. Prior to the floods of 2010 our only source of income was from the milk we would sell from the few cattles we owned. Our village was partly affected by the flood. Unfortunately, our house was also affected and because of the water, it collapsed.

A year ago, an organisation offered to build us a house and asked us to contribute Rs. 30,000 towards the building cost. I sold my livestock to do so. They started the construction but used materials that were not suitable for the environment in which we lived in. We were cheated and they fled away leaving the work unfinished.

I am thankful to the Aalim of our village who recommended my name to The World Federation and its partner in Pakistan as someone who is in need of a new home. Now my family and I are very happy to live in dignity in our newly constructed home gifted to us by The World Federation of KSIMC.”

STORY 3:  A FARMER AND FATHER OF 7
“I am simply a farmer who works on other people’s land. When the floods came, I was earning my livelihood by sowing rice crop. Needless to say, this crop was all ruined and the landlord would not pay me my wage for the work I had done. My muddy house was also struck down and we lived in government school for two months. We were then asked to leave and returned back to our village and lived under the open sky. Winter was starting and the weather was extreme.

An organisation was distributing tents but only those who were referred received one. I had no one to recommend me, so I borrowed money from someone and purchase a tent for Rs.5,000 by. We lived in this tent for one year. I then made a mud cottage for my family and I.

One day, after magribain prayers, I met a momin in the mosque. He knew of my condition and told me about the new housing project of The World Federation of KSIMC and that he sent my name to their representatives for a new home. I was interviewed with due process and after they were satisfied with my case, they built a home for my homeless family. My family is very much glad to get it without any monetary charge. We are praying from the core of our hearts for the donors. I think it is an unforgettable gift from our Imam e Zamana (ajtf).”

SPONSOR A NEW HOME
The cost of building one home is $1,600 USD. The size of one house is about 180 square feet (12.5’x14.5’x11’) and the attached restroom is 20 square feet. To help build more homes for the thousands of displaced families across Pakistan’s flood affected areas, please donate to The World Federation’s Pakistan Flood Relief Fund. For sponsorship opportunities or to build a house in memory of a loved one, please email [email protected]

DONATE ONLINE:
Donate in Europe
Donate in North America
Donate in the rest of the World

JAMAAT TREASURER
Donate directly to your Jamaat Treasurer

For more information or to sponsor the construction of new homes in the memory of a loved one, please email [email protected]

 


Related News


In January 2015, The World Federation launched an appeal to raise funds for building water well hand-pumps in Pakistani villages where families do not have access to clean water.


The month of Ramadhan is a time for prayer, fasting and self-reformation. Yet, it is often also a time when we indulge (or over-indulge in many cases!) in unhealthy, fried and fatty foods!


The Ali Asghar Water Appeal is an ongoing initiative by The World Federation to provide access to clean water and sanitation facilities in areas of deprivation. In many parts of the developing world, women and children walk for miles to fetch drinking water.